Fccwaterfall9-18-12

Rain Falling On a Tin Roof

True this last summer we lucked out on rain, only getting it for about an hour during the day or while we were on an overnight. But anyone who has been at camp and familiar with our cabins and their solid metal roofs will

falling creek cabin
recognize the sound of rain smacking down overhead, sounding less like raindrops and more like showers of pebbles.
tinroof

Some find the uproar of rain thumping against metal soothing, while others quickly learn to enjoy the sound after realizing it means they’re not out in it. Whatever your relationship with the rain is, you will recognize it as one of the night time (or rest-period) noises that you have become accustomed to.

Some other noises that accompany it, if the rain has taken on a life of its own: the ambiance of drainage as the summertime shower turns into a temperate deluge and inspires a river under your cabin.
runoff sound

Like I mentioned earlier, if any of these sounds spur on a memory harkening back to your days at the Creek, whether that be this last summer or the summer of ‘82, feel free to leave a comment about it in the comment section below.

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4 MORE Basic Knots to Know

Last month I did an article about useful knots to know on a campout. Although having a knack for those afore mentioned knots help in countless situations, there’s still a bundle of bindings out there that can help in others. I’m not saying these knots are more important. But they will help you with other necessities that may not necessarily apply to a campout, but still useful to know, like…

4. The Carrick Bend
Falling Creek Carrick Bend Knot

Let’s say you had a heavy burden, that you feel uneasy supporting with a cord bound by a square knot— which is after all just two overhand knots. There is another more complicated knot out there, meant for holding more weight and looking even more awesome.

The Carrick Bend is like the sheet bend, binds two ropes with more security, but with another added twist. To tie one, you need only

Falling Creek Carrick Bend Sequence
1. Make a loop with one string.
2. Draw your other rope under the loop.
3. Pull the rope around the outside of the loop
4. Bring it back under the loop
5. And thread it over itself, so that both knots look identically entwined.

Before you pull it tight, it looks like a celtic knot when you’re done.

3. The Timber Hitch

Let’s say you wanted a knot that acts like a slipknot, fastening itself around the base of a tree or a stationary object, but don’t want to strangle any tree or piece of wood you tie it to.

Timber hitches are great for securing heavy objects to solid bases, like a bear bag to a tree, or a guitar string to a bridge. You only need to…

Falling Creek Timber Hitch Knot
Falling Creek Timber Hitch Knot

1. Wrap a length of rope around your base (a tree, a pole, or in my case, a broom stick)
2. Feed the rope back under the loop
3. Then through the loop
4. Then feed your rope back over, through the loop again
5. and again…
(and again… and again… and as many times you need!)

Once it’s cinched down, it will stay as tight as you can pull. When you decide you’re done using it, you can undo it in a snap!

2. Alpine Butterfly Loop
Falling Creek Alpine Butterfly Knot

Let’s say you want to create a loop in the middle of a rope that doesn’t constrict or release. You need something similar to a bowline but don’t want to use either end which you have strapped to a harness or to the climbing wall. You need to make a loop without using the ends of the rope.

In this situation, an alpine butterfly makes perfect loops for climbing, especially if you want to hook in extra straps or items.

falling creek alpine butterfly sequence

You need only…
1. Wrap the rope across your palm

Falling Creek Alpine Butterfly Knot

2. Around your top three fingers,
3. And back across your palm to make an ‘x’ shape.
4. Then, taking the loop created at the tips of your fingers, pull down over the ‘x’ in your palm
5. Feed it up and under.

Remove your hand and you should have a beautiful knot in its place.

Unfortunately, you can only appreciate the butterfly shape ‘til you pull both ends tight to make the Alpine Butterfly loop.

1. That Necklace “Tightener” Knot That Everyone Does (AKA The Barrel Knot)

falling creek necklace knot waterbottle
Some of you may see those knots that blacksmiths use to tie off their arrowheads or talismans. They can adjust to any size around your neck. They can be used to cinch down necklaces or makes straps around the lip of a water bottle.

It’s called the barrel knot.

And to get it started, you will need to tie essentially a double slipknot. Those of you who read my last entry may know my feelings about slipknots. This case is the only instance I recommend using one.

falling creek camp barrel knot

1. Lay your necklace on a table.
2. Loop one end twice around the other rope
3. Pull the excess cord of the tip through the loops from the far side.
4. Do an identical knot with the other cord and make sure the lines are even.

falling creek necklace knot

It’s a simple knot to throw together. If the double loop is too tricky for you, you can do 1 loop. Or if it’s hardly enough, you can do 3 loops (but any more and it just looks ridiculous).

Hopefully these knots will come in handy when you need them.

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Brilliant Beaufort

Chilton and Heath Simmons hosted the Beaufort, SC area Falling Creek Camp Movies and Reunion tonight at their beautiful home. Chilton was a Camp Greystone girl and they are thrilled that their son G will be attending FCC this coming summer.

Returning campers and boys who came to learn more about Falling Creek joined Blair Hines and Yates in this group photo.  Blair, currently an oral surgeon for the Navy, is originally from Raleigh, NC.  He was in Yates' cabin back in the late 80's.  Blair was also a top kayaker at FCC as a camper and counselor. Now Blair and Tracy's two boys will be coming to FCC this summer to follow in Blair's footsteps.  Returning campers and boys who came to learn more about Falling Creek joined Blair Hines and Yates in this group photo. Blair, currently an oral surgeon for the Navy, is originally from Raleigh, NC. He was in Yates' cabin back in the late 80's. Blair was also a top kayaker at FCC as a camper and counselor. Now Blair and Tracy's two boys will be coming to FCC this summer to follow in Blair's footsteps.
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Cool Columbus

Yates traveled south to Columbus, GA where Kate and Whitfield Athey hosted the Falling Creek Camp Movies and Reunion at their beautiful home. Two of their four boys will be going to FCC this summer and Whitfield will be going to Father/Son Weekend with his boys.

Jack and Max, FCC veteran campers, helped Yates answer questions from the families who attended.  They are excited to be going back to camp this coming summer.Jack and Max, FCC veteran campers, helped Yates answer questions from the families who attended. They are excited to be going back to camp this coming summer.
Falling Creek Campers, boys who came to learn about camp, alumni, and dads who have attended Father/Son Weekend, posed for a group shot.Falling Creek Campers, boys who came to learn about camp, alumni, and dads who have attended Father/Son Weekend, posed for a group shot.
The families watched the new camp movie and then talked about why camp is such an amazing experience for the boys. They were also able to take home the new camp DVD which has 6 new videos and the 2014 highlights.The families watched the new camp movie and then talked about why camp is such an amazing experience for the boys. They were also able to take home the new camp DVD which has 6 new videos and the 2014 highlights.
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Gentlemanly Tips From The Gentlemen of Falling Creek:Part 2

It is time again for all men of the Creek out there to go and take their dinner coats out of their wardrobes and pull-up a chair to a 4 course meal of awesomeness. The gentlemen of Falling Creek have some more advice for you.

We don’t want it to seem like we are lecturing you about the importance of following these rules in public engagements in any way, we just want to pass over some suggestions to you; gent-to-gent. We notice some of you do this anyway, but we figure, like any downtown gala raising money for the arts, the more the merrier.

Cell Phones: A Problem for a New Era

15 years ago, cell phones weren’t a problem with encumbering a man and his need to be gently. People remembered directions, called from restaurants, and played video games on their own console, but this device for the modern day gentlemen is most likely here-to-stay (or be replaced by a pair of glasses which can do the same thing without the annoyance of having to look down). Having accepted as much, it’s high time we all accept a general list of rules to go with them that may have gone unsaid up until this point.

At Falling Creek we confiscate your cellphones to enjoy the environment surrounding you. You get a unique opportunity to get away from machines and games and anything with a screen in general. But in the real world, chances are, you take these things with you to do research in science class. So, it’s important to remember that not everyone will appreciate seeing you using your phone when they’re watching you drive.

This may be a piece of friendly advice for the older people who read this blog, with a license, and a sporty

Falling Creek Camp Playing Guitar
Lincoln or Ford. But texting while you are driving makes it 23 times more likely you will crash. It also kills 11 teens a day. Plus, as a rule, makes everyone else in the car with you a little less easy. Gentlemen always leave their phones out-of-sight, in their pocket, or hidden in his center console, when they are driving.

If he is driving to the Opera, he knows to use his phone in the lobby or parking lot, but never in the theater area. This can apply to movie theaters too— or even church. This can be a distraction to the performers, if they are live, and the people around you.

You could also go ahead and extend this to the people who have to stand next to you in the grocery line, on an airplane, in a classroom, or going up an elevator— really any situation where someone is given the pleasure of being in your company whether they can help it or not.

Now it may sound like there is nowhere for you to use your cell phone (or in some cases, tablets) except while you’re alone in your bedroom— which makes you wonder why you didn’t go out and buy a PC from the beginning to alleviate you of all the trouble. But there are dozens of situations where you can go and use your phone in a public setting.
For instance, if you are at a high school football game, a soccer match, or any other loud outdoor place where everyone is screaming, or if you are alone in any of the places mentioned above.

Of course it goes without saying, you needn’t mind yourself if you are a doctor on call, or in a business meeting hoping to use it for a phone conference, or any situation of emergency. Though most times it is common sense, I assure you, the people enjoying the time of your company won’t be able to thank you enough for getting your full attention, rather having to talk to you while you’re making a bid on EBay.

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