A Call To Action!

Some of you may know that Duke Energy is planning to build [web link] a new 230kV transmission line [web link showing types of towers] from Campobello, South Carolina to the site of a new natural gas plant in Asheville that will aid in the replacement of the current coal plant. The potential routes for the line were recently released. Two of those line segments pass through a part of camp. Those segments are named 8B, 10A, and 4.

Duke Energy Proposed New 230kV Transmission Line Across Falling Creek Camp. Note: The yellow line on the map represents the proposed location of the transmission line construction.  It illustrates a 1,000 foot wide area that Duke Energy used to contact all property owners within this area. The final right-of-way condemnation will be 150 feet wide in the center of this yellow line. Duke Energy Proposed New 230kV Transmission Line Across Falling Creek Camp. Note: The yellow line on the map represents the proposed location of the transmission line construction. It illustrates a 1,000 foot wide area that Duke Energy used to contact all property owners within this area. The final right-of-way condemnation will be 150 feet wide in the center of this yellow line.

The lines are an answer to a problem of growth which gives rise to its own specific family of issues, one of which is that of protection for the resources we share on this increasingly crowded shelf. And of those precious resources, one is particularly difficult to protect as it happens to be the one resource missing from every map and geological survey: PLACE. Rather, what most could attest to having felt at some point as ‘a sense of place.’ For some, it’s frustratingly abstract: Hard to relate, hard to describe, and tragically most often evinced only when it is destroyed. It is the impression left by any number of elements around us; sounds, clouds, smells, trees, the light, a shared experience, the way a ridge writes its own particular horizon from any given view—feelings that would be forever absented by the proposed misplacements of infrastructure despite serving to comprise the fundamental essence of this region’s allure: places that leave an impression on us. Putting those line segments in the wrong location would cut deeply into the heart and bone of our state and yet still such value is ignored simply because we have no way to measure the impact that a place has on a human. We seem able only to read the inverse.

You can’t see Bob’s Creek Road from Asheville, nor can you see Green River Road or Cabin Creek. They could be overlooked as quaint country roads, or scenic fodder for the fronts of postcards. But those roads demark some very special places, places that by their years seem to have been welcomed into the very landscape that bears them. Knowing that the beauty and permanence of these places has been safeguarded for those who love them and those who have yet to know them is what sets this region apart.

I doubt Duke could be convinced not to build a line at all, but if this region is destined to grow, then please tell Duke it needs to be done right. ‘Out of sight, out of mind’ is a pernicious ideal. Our opinion is they should build the lines near existing infrastructure or in existing right-of-ways.

Duke is taking comments until August 14th. Below is the link where you can write to them, however we ask that you please be constructive, just like we model here using the FCC Code [web link]:

Interactive map [web link]:

Steps:
1. Click the blue button at the top center of the map labeled “Submit a Comment”
2. Register (pick a user name and password, etc)
3. Search for Falling Creek by address (Type in 816 Falling Creek Camp Rd., Zirconia, NC 28790)
4. Leave a comment about segments 8b, 10, and 4.

Many thanks for taking the time to offer your comments.